CURRICULUM VITAE

Gary L. Wells

July 2005

ADDRESS: Department of Psychology Phone: (515)294-6033

Iowa State University FAX: (515)294-6424

476 Science

Ames, Iowa 50011

E-mail: glwells@iastate.edu
Web site: http://www.psychology.iastate.edu/faculty/gwells/homepage.htm
EDUCATION:
B.Sc. Honors (1973) Psychology , Kansas State University

Ph. D. (1977) Experimental Social Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY:
2001:   Norman L. Munn Distinguished Scholar, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
1998 - Present: DistinguishedProfessor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology,
            Iowa State University
1989 - Present: Professor, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (Department
            Chair from 1988-1992)
1984 - 1988: Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
1985:  Visiting Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Toronto, Ontario
1981 - 1984: Associate Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
1977 - 1980: Assistant Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
1979 - Present: Consultant to both defense and prosecution counsel in state and federal criminal
            cases involving eyewitness memory, crime investigation procedures, and evidence evaluation
1986 - 1988: Consultant to Weiden and Associates on development of police recruitment exams
1984 - 1985: Special Consultant to the Law Reform Commission of Canada
1985   Visiting Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto
1983 - 1984: Visiting Scholar, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
1976:   Investigative Officer into patient abuse at Lima State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, Lima, Ohio
1974 - 1976: Instructor, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

OFFICES IN NATIONAL SOCIETIES:
Chair, Fellows Committee, American Psychology-Law Society, 2001-2004
President-elect, American Psychology-Law Society, 2004-2005

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS:

American Psychological Association (Member and Fellow)

American Psychological Society (Member and Fellow)

Midwestern Psychological Association

Personality and Social Psychology (APA Division 8)

Society for Personality and Social Psychology (Fellow)

Psychology and Law (APA Division 41, Fellow)

American Psychology/Law Society

Society for the Advancement of Social Psychology

Society of Experimental Social Psychology (since 1980)

Judgment and Decision Making Society

Psychonomics

Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition

EDITORIAL OFFICES AND DUTIES:

Consulting Editor:

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Consulting Editor, 2000-present

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Consulting Editor, 2003-present

Law and Human Behavior, Consulting Editor, 1984-present

Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, Consulting Editor, 1995-2006

Applied Cognitive Psychology, Consulting Editor, 1997-present

Contemporary Psychology, Advisory Editor, 1991-1997

Forensic Reports, Consulting Editor, 1987-1992

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Consulting Editor, 1979-1980,

    1989-1990, 1992-1994

Journal of Applied Psychology, Consulting Editor, 1983-1994

Law and Human Behavior, Guest Editor, 1980

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 1992-1994

Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, Guest Editor, 1995

Journal Reviewer for:

American Psychologist; Applied Cognitive Psychology; Basic and Applied Social Psychology; Behavioral Sciences and the Law; British Journal of Social Psychology, Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science; Canadian Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Journal of Applied Psychology; Journal of Applied Social Psychology; Journal of Consumer Research; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied; Journal of Experimental Psychology: General; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition; Journal of Experimental Social Psychology; Journal of Personality; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology; Journal of Research in Personality; Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology; Law and Human Behavior; Law and Society Review; Memory and Cognition; Osgoode Hall Law Journal; Perception and Psychophysics; Perceptual and Motor Skills; Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin; Psychological Bulletin; Psychological Science; Psychological Review; Psychology, Public Policy, and Law; Social Behaviour; Social Cognition; Social Psychology Quarterly Manuscript Reviewer for:

Academic Press, Allyn & Bacon, Brooks-Cole, Cambridge University Press, Harper &

Row, John Wiley & Sons, McGraw-Hill, Random House, Wadsworth

Program and Grant Reviewer for:

APA Program Committee - Psychology and Law Division, 1986,1987,1992, 1997

APA Program Committee Reviewer - Division of Personality and Social

Psychology, 1988, 1990

American Psychology - Law Society Program Committee,1986,1992,1994, 1996; 1998

APA Fellows Committee, Division 41, 1989-1996

Law Enforcement Assistance Administration

National Science Foundation grant applications (Law & Social Science Division and

Social and Developmental Psychology Division)

MPA - Membership Committee, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council grant applications

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Adjudication Committee

Member, 1987, Ottawa

National Committees and Task Forces:

Chair, Committee on Scientific Evidence Concerning Eyewitness Identification,
  American Psychology/Law Society [March,1996-December 1998]

National Guidelines for Eyewitness Evidence Panel, U. S. Department of Justice [March 1998-October 1999]

Eyewitness Evidence Training Panel, U.S. Department of Justice [July 1997-2001]

Co-Chair, Eyewitness Identification PoliceTraining Manual Writing Committee, National Institute of Justice [1999-2001]

Boston Police Department Task Force on Eyewitness Evidence [2004]
 

GRANTS and AWARDS:

2005-2008  National Science Foundation, research grant on decision processes in expert fishermen, ($545,238), co-PI

2005-2010  Australian Research Council research grant, ($371,000), Partner Investigator with Neil Brewer

2002-2006  National Science Foundation research grant ($329,998), principal investigator.

2000-2002  Australian Research Council, research grant, ($112,400), Partner Investigator with Neil Brewer

2000: Distinguished Contributions to Psychology and Law Award
                from the American Psychology-Law Society.

1999: Recognition for "Outstanding Service and Dedication to Improving the Use of Eyewitness
                Evidence," U.S. Department of Justice, October 26, 1999

1998-2002: National Science Foundation research grant ($285,703), principal investigator

1998: Awarded title of Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences

1996: Career Research Excellence Award, Iowa State University

1993 -1997: National Science Foundation research grant ($272,970), Principal Investigator

1991 -1993: National Science Foundation research grant ($177,000), Principal Investigator

1988 -1991: SSHRCC grant for eyewitness research, Principal Investigator

1985 -1988: SSHRCC grant for eyewitness research, Principal Investigator

1983 -1984: SSHRCC Study Leave Grant

1981 -1983:SHRCC grant for eyewitness research, Principal Investigator

1980: SSHRCC Conference Grant

COURSES AND WORKSHOPS TAUGHT:

Introductory Psychology

Social Psychology (Graduate and Undergraduate level)

Individual and Social Behavior

Judgment and Decision Making Processes (Graduate level)

Research Methods in Social Psychology (Graduate level)

Social Cognition (Graduate level)

Psychology and the Litigation Process (Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, 1985)

Workshops and presentations on eyewitness identification to police departments, defense attorneys, prosecutors, criminal justice researchers, crime investigators, victims groups, and trial judges in Alaska, Alberta, Arkansas, Arizona, Australia, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Manitoba, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Ontario, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, DC, and Wisconsin, as well as national organizations.

REFEREED PAPERS AT NATIONAL AND REGIONAL MEETINGS:

Erickson, J. R., Wells, G. L. & Traub, B. (1974). Tests of a model of formal syllogistic reasoning. Psychonomic Society, Boston.

Wells, G. L., & Petty, R. E. (1975). Conditions for transfer of excitation from sexual arousal to aggression. American Psychological Association, September, Chicago.

Petty, R. E., Wells, G. L., & Brock, T. C. (1975). To distract or not to distract? It depends on message counterarguability. Midwestern Psychological Association, May, Chicago.

Cialdini, R. B., Wells, G. L., & Petty, R. E. (1975). Equity in the eyes of the creditor. Midwestern Psychological Association, May, Chicago.

Wells, G. L. (1976). Information sought in person impressions. American Psychological Association, September, Washington, D.C.

Leippe, M. R., Wells, G. L., & Ostrom, T. M. (1976). Importance of the crime and accuracy in eyewitness identification. American Psychological Association, September, Washington, D.C.

Wells, G. L., & Ostrom, T. M. (1976). Guidelines for assessing the fairness of a lineup. American Psychological Association, September, Washington, D.C.

Wells, G. L. (1976). The theoretical equivocality of dependent variables in attribution research. Midwestern Psychological Association, May, Chicago.

Petty, R. E., Wells, G. L., & Brock, T. C. (1976). Distraction can enhance or reduce persuasion by interfering with counter-arguments or favorable thoughts. Midwestern Psychological Association, May, Chicago.

Wells, G. L. et al. (1977). Anticipated discussion of interpretation eliminates actor-observer differences in the attribution of causality. Midwestern Psychological Association, May, Chicago.

Ferguson, T. J., & Wells, G. L. (1979). Priming mediators of causal attribution. Canadian Psychological Association, June, Quebec City.

Lindsay, R. C. L., & Wells, G. L. (1979). Jurors' detection of eyewitness-identification accuracy within and across situations. Canadian Psychological Association, June, Quebec City.

Wells, G. L. (1980). Social psychology in Canada in the seventies. Canadian Psychological Association, June, Calgary.

Wells, G. L., & Enzle, M. E. (1980). Attribution research in the 1980s: Picking up the pieces. American Psychological Association, Montreal.

Wells, G. L. (1981). Systems approach in eyewitness testimony. Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Bloomington, IN, October.

Wells, G. L. (1986). Chairman of symposium on "The quality of eyewitness evidence." American Psychology-Law Society meeting, Tucson, AZ, March.

Turtle, J. W., & Wells, G. L. (1987). Children's eyewitness evidence. International Conference on Applied Aspects of Memory, Swansea, Wales, August.

Wells, G. L., Turtle, J. W., & Luus, E. (1988). The confidence of child eyewitnesses. American Psychology/Law Society Conference, Miami, FL, March.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L. (1989). Accuracy and perceived credibility of child and adult eyewitnesses. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, May.

Johnson, R., Rennie, R., & Wells, G. L. (1989). The omission effect and expertise in baseball. Psychonomic Society, Boston, MA, November.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L. (1990). On the selection of distractors for lineups. American Psychology/Law Society, Alexandria, VA, March.

Wells, G. L. (1990). Police lineups as experiments. Invited presentation. Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Buffalo, NY, October.

Wells, G. L. (1991). Chairing a psychology department. Invited workshop given to new chairs, Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, Santa Fe, NM, February.

Wells, G. L. (1991). Naked statistical evidence of liability: Is subjective probability sufficient? Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, May.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L. (1991). Eyewitness confidence: Social influence and belief perseverance. American Psychological Society, Washington, DC, June.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L. (1992). Juror's perceptions of child and adult eyewitness. American Psychology/Law Society, San Diego, CA, March.

Wells, G. L. (1992). Statistical evidence of liability: Is subjective probability enough? American Psychology/Law Society, San Diego, CA, March.

Wells, G. L. (1992). Toward improving justice in police lineups and eyewitness testimony. American Psychology/Law Society, San Diego, CA, March.

Warner, T. W., & Wells, G. L. (1992). Intuitive understanding by mock jurors of factors that influence the validity of lineup identifications. American Psychology/Law Society, San Diego, CA, March.

Wells, G. L. (1992) Issues and procedures for dealing with sexual harassment. Invited presentation. Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, Tampa, FL, February.

Wells, G. L. (1992). Social influences on eyewitness confidence. Society of Experimental Social Psychology, San Antonio, TX, October.

Wells, G. L. (1992). The role of base rates in false identification. Judgment and Decision Making Research Meeting, St. Louis, MO, November.

Seelau, E. P., Rydell, S. M., & Wells, G. L. (1993). Counterfactual processing can lead to increased rape victim blame. American Psychological Society Convention, Chicago, IL, June.

Kasimatis, M., & Wells, G. L. (1993). Counterfactual thinking: Evidence for individual differences. American Psychological Society Convention, Chicago, IL, June.

Wells, G. L. (1995). Evidence evaluation in a Post-O. J. World. Talk presented at annual meeting of the Judgment and Decision Making Society, Los Angeles, November, 1995.

Wells, G. L. and Bradfield. A. (1997). Post-lineup feedback to eyewitnesses distorts more than just their confidence. Talk presented at the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition conference, Toronto, July, 1997.

Wells, G. L. (1997). Proper procedures for lineups and photospreads. American Psychological Association, Chicago, August, 1997.

Bradfield, A. L. & Wells, G. L. (1998). Can suggestive feedback effects be moderated? American Psychology/Law Society biennial conference. Los Angeles, March, 1998.

Wells, G. L. & Bradfield, A. L. (1998). Issues in the measurement of lineup fairness. American Psychology/Law Society biennial conference. Los Angeles, March, 1998.

Wells, G. L. (1998). Lineups and photospreads: Rules that ought to govern how they are conducted. American Psychology/Law Society biennial conference. Los Angeles, March, 1998.

Olsen, B., & Wells, G.L. (2001). Launching the psychology of alibis.  Society for the Application of Research in Memory and Cognition biennial conference. Kingston, Ontario, June, 2001.

Wells, G. L. (2002). Improving lineups to avoid convicting the innocent.  Austin, TX, American Psychology-Law Society biennial meeting, March, 2002.

Wells, G. L. (2002). Eyewitness identification: The distorting effects of postidentification feedback effect. Columbus, Ohio, Society of Experimental Social Psychology, October, 2002.
 

 
INVITED COLLOQUIA, WORKSHOPS, AND LECTURES
State University of New York at Buffalo, NY, 1977.

George Mason University, 1977.

University of Western Ontario, London, ON, 1977.

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 1979.

Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 1981.

Oxford University, 1981.

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 1981.

Midwestern Psychological Association, Detroit, MI, 1981.

Interdisciplinary Conference. Jackson Hole, WY, January, 1981.

University of Calgary, October, 1982.

University of Lethbridge, October, 1982.

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, June, 1983.

American Psychological Association, Anaheim, CA, August, 1983.

University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, November, 1983.

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, March, 1984.

Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, March, 1984.

University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, March, 1984.

University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, April, 1984.

Scarborough College, Toronto, ON, April, 1984.

University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, May, 1984.

Missouri Trial Lawyers Association, Columbia, MO, June, 1984.

University of California, Los Angeles, CA, March, 1985.

American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA, August, 1985.

Queen's University, Kingston, ON, October, 1985.

Queen's University Law School, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, October, 1985.

Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice, Edmonton, AB, August, 1986.

California Continuing Judicial Studies Program. Lake Tahoe, CA, August, 1986.

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, January, 1987.

Manitoba Queen's Bench Judges, Hecla Island, MB, May, 1987.

Canadian Psychological Association Meeting, Vancouver, BC, June, 1987.

International Conference on Applied Aspects of Memory, Swansea, Wales, August, 1987.

Purdue University, Lafayette, IN, December, 1987.

Senior police detectives across Canada (workshop). Calgary, AB, September, 1988.

Trial Judges of Manitoba. Winnipeg, MB, December, 1988.

Edmonton Police. Edmonton, AB, February, 1989.

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, February, 1989.

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, June, 1989.

Winnipeg Police. Winnipeg, MB, September, 1989.

Toronto Metro Police Detectives. Toronto, ON, October, 1989.

Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, May, 1990.

Ontario Police College, London, ON, June, 1990 (series of talks).

Morningside College, Sioux City, IA, February, 1991.

University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, April, 1991.

Drake University, Des Moines, IA, April, 1991.

Minnesota Trial Judges Association, September, 1992.

Florida International University, Miami, November, 1992.

International Conference on Forensic Statistics, Tempe, AZ, March, 1993.

University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, April, 1993.

False Memory Syndrome Foundation, Des Moines, IA, 1994.

American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, 1994.

Ohio State University, Columbus, O., November, 1994.

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, December, 1994.

International Association of Forensic Phonetics, Orlando, July, 1995.

Pennsylvania Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys, Harrisburg, PA, October, 1995.

Hope College, Holland, MI, October, 1995.

University of Iowa, November, 1995.

University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, April, 1996.

Midwestern Psychological Association, May, 1996.

Muskingum College, New Concord, Ohio, October, 1996.

Kansas Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, November, 1996.

Northwestern University Law School, Chicago, March 1997.

National Defense Investigators Association meeting, San Antonio, TX, March, 1997.

Public Defenders and Defense Investigators Workshop, Neenah, WI, May, 1997.

County Prosecutors of Iowa, Okoboji, IA, June 1997 .

Society of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, Toronto, July, 1997.

American Psychological Association, Chicago, August, 1997.

Federal Bar Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico, September, 1997.

Federal Defenders Meeting, Des Moines, IA, October 1997.

Northwestern University Law School, Chicago, March 1998.

Saint Louis University, March, 1998.

Iowa State University Commencement Address, May 1998.

Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation Meeting, Washington, DC, July 1998.

American Medical Association Meeting on Patient Safety, Rancho Mirage, CA, Nov. 1998.

Federal Bar Council Meeting, Kona, Hawaii, February 1999.

Northwestern University Law School, Chicago, March 1999.

Western Illinois University, April 1999.

Conference of New Jersey Trial Judges, New Jersey, April 1999.

Oklahoma Criminal and Death Defenders Association, Oklahoma City, May 1999.

American Psychology/Law Society Presidential Initiative, Vancouver, B.C., July 1999.

Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, Keynote Address,Boulder, CO, July, 1999

Federal Judicial Center, Washington, DC, July 1999.

American Bar Foundation/American Psychological Association joint conference, invited address,
    Washington, DC, October, 1999.

University of North Carolina Psychology Department, invited colloquium, Greensboro, NC,
    October, 1999.

Suffolk University Law School, invited talks, Boston, MA, November 1999.

Nothwestern University Law School, invited talk, February, 2000.

Miscarriages of Justice Conference, Distinguished Speaker, Newport Beach, CA, March
          2000.

Kansas State University, invited colloquium, March 2000 .

University of Arkansas, invited colloquium, March 2000.

American Psychology-Law Society, Keynote Speaker, New Orleans, March 2000.

National Consortium of State Courts, invited address, Newark, NJ, May 2000.

University of Georgia, Georgia Medical College, invited colloquium, May, 2000.

Capitol Hill Science Seminar, Invited Address to U.S. congressional and executive branch staffers,
   Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., July, 2000.

Capitol Hill Science Seminar, Address to congressional and executive branch staffers in U.S.  Government, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., July, 2000.

New York State Public Defenders' Association, invited address, Catskills, July, 2000.

National Academy of Sciences, invited talk, Washington, DC, September, 2000.

New Jersey County Prosecutors, invited address, Atlantic City, September, 2000.

Indiana Public Defenders' Council, invited address, Indianapolis, October, 2000.

St. Francis Xavier University, colloquium and invited address, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, October, 2000.

McKenna-Claremont College, invited address, Claremont, California, October, 2000.

California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, invited workshop presentation, Berkeley, California, October, 2000.

Florida International University, Psychology Department invited colloquium, Miami, October, 2000.

Palm Beach Criminal Lawyers Association, invited address, West Palm Beach, FL, October, 2000.

National Seminar on Forensic Evidence and Criminal Law, invited address, Philadelphia, November, 2000.

Federal Bar Association - Inn of  Court, invited address, Manhattan, NY, November, 2000.

The Innocence Network - Digitized lecture broadcast over the internet to law classes in numerous law schools, filmed in Houston, TX,  with live audience, January, 2001.

Australian Psychological Society Forensic Psychology Conference, Sydney, Australia, February, 2001.

University of Melbourne, Psychology Department invited colloquium, Melbourne, Australia, February, 2001.

Flinders University, Psychology Department invited colloquium, Adelaide, Australia, March, 2001.

Univeristy of Adeliade, Psychology Department invited colloquium, Adelaide, Australia, March, 2001.

University of South Australia, Psychology Department invited colloquium, Adelaide, Australia, March, 2001.

Northwestern University Law School, invited talks (two), Chicago, April, 2001.

Missouri Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, invited address, St. Louis, April, 2001.

Daemon College, invited address, Buffalo, NY, April 2001.

Philadelphia Municipial Judges Asscociation Meeting, invited address, Philadelphia, May 2001.

New Jersey Police and Prosecutors, seminar on eyewitness evidence, Princeton, NJ, May, 2001.

New Jersey State Public Defenders' Association, invited address, Somerset, NJ, May, 2001.

Philadelphia Public Defenders' Association, invited talk, Philadelphia, May, 2001.

Philadelphia Municipial Judges Asscociation Meeting, invited address, Philadelphia, May 2001.

Society for the Application of Research in Memory and Cognition, keynote address, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, June 2001.

American Psychological Society, invited plenary address, Presidential Symposium, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 2001.

New Jersey Chiefs of Police, invited address, Atlantic City, June, 2001.

Massachusetts Public Defenders, invited address, Boston, June 2001.

National Conference on Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation, invited talk, Washington, DC, July, 2001.

National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, invited address, Minneapolis, August 2001.

Judicial Institute, Invited Address, Des Moines, August 2001.

American Psychological Association, Distinguished Contributions to Forensic Psychology  Award address, San Francisco, August 2001.

National Conference on Science and the Law, invited address, Miami, October, 2001.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, Psychology Department Colloquium, October, 2001.

Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT, Colloquium, October, 2001.

Baker University, Keynote Address, Conference, Baldwin City, KS, November, 2001.

Brooklyn District Attorney's Office, invited presentation, Brooklyn, NY, November, 2001.

California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, Keynote Address, Monterey, CA,  February, 2002.

New York City Police Department, invited presentation to Police Commissioner and others, February, 2002.

University of Nevada - Reno, invited colloquium (2 talks), Reno, NV, March, 2002.

Williams College, invited colloquium, Williamstown, MA, March, 2002.

National Seminar on Forensic Evidence, invited address, New Orleans, April, 2002.

National Association of Defense Investigators, invited address, Portland, OR, April, 2002.

Harvard University, Innocence and the Law, invited panel presentation, Cambridge, MA, April, 2002.

University of Illinois-Springfield, invited address, Springfield, IL, May, 2002.

South Carolina Public Defenders, invited presentations/workshop, Columbia, SC, May, 2002.

California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, invited lecture, Las Vegas, NV, June, 2002.

Illinois General Assembly, Judiciary Committee, invited oral statement, Chicago, June, 2002.

San Diego Public Defenders, seminar lecture, San Diego, CA, June 2002.

Capital Defense Attorneys Conference, invited lecture, Airlie House, Maryland, July, 2002.

Regional Criminal Defense Seminar, invited lecture, St. Charles, IL, August, 2002.

Illinois Appelate Judges Association, invited lecture, Galena, IL, October, 2002.

Criminal Defense Advocacy Seminar, invited lecture, November, 2002, Drake University Law School, November, 2002.

District of Columbia Criminal Practice Institute, keynote speaker, Georgetown Law Center, Washington, DC, November, 2002.

Carnegie Melon University, Department of Social and Decision Sciences, invited colloquium, Pittsburgh, PA, November, 2002.

Minnesota Judges Association, invited address, Minneapolis, December 2002.

Arizona Attorneys for Criminal Justice, invited lecture, Prescott, AZ, January, 2003.

National Conference on Preventing the Conviction of Innocent Persons, invited speaker, Alexandria, VA, January, 2003.

Chase College of Law, invited speaker, Cincinatti, Ohio, February, 2003.

Innocence Network Conference, invited speaker (2 talks), New Orleans, March 2003.

Southeastern Psychological Association, keynote, New Orleans, March 2003.

Illinois State Bar Association CLE program, Invited lecture, Oakbrook, IL, March 2003.

Suffolk County Criminal Bar Assoication, Invited Lecture, Suffolk County, NY, March, 2003.

Illinois State Bar Association CLE program, Invited Lecture, Oakbrook, IL, April 2003.

California Public Defenders Association, Invited Lecure, Sacramento, CA, April, 2003.

Wisconsin Police Training Seminar, all day workshop, Madison, WI, April 2003.

Los Angeles Police Department, Invited Presentation, Los Angeles, May 2003.

Alaska Bar Association, Invited Presentation, Fairbanks, Alaska, May 2003.

University of Washington Law School Conference, Invited Lecture, Seattle, May 2003.

North Carolina Innocence Commission, Invited Presentation, Durham, NC, May 2003.

Illinois Supreme Court Conference on Capital Cases, Invited Presentation, Chicago, May 2003.

Illinois Advanced Judicial Academy, Invited Talks (2), Champaign, IL, June, 2003.

State Bar of Wisconsin, Invited Talk, Madison, WI, June, 2003.

American Psychological Association, Master Lecture, Toronto, August 2003

State Bar of Wisconsin, invited presentation, Madison, WI, June, 2003.

Minnesota Criminal Justice Institute, invited presentation, Bloomington, MN, August 2003.

Illinois Judicial Academy, invited lecture, Springfield, IL, September 2003.

Colorado District Attorneys Association, Breckenridge, CO, invited presentation, September 2003.

Washington Univeristy Psychology Department, St Louis, MO, invited colloquium, October, 2003.

New York State Judicial Institute, New York, NY, invited presentation, October 2003.

Northwestern University Law School, Chicago, IL, invited talk, October 2003.

Wisconsin Avery Commission, Capitol Building, Madison, WI, testimony to Commission, February, 2004.

Great Plains Student Psychology Conference, keynote address, Rockhurst College, Kansas City, March 2004.

National Legal Aid Defenders’ Association, keynote address, Memphis, TN, March 2004.

Texas Tech University, featured speaker, 2nd Annual Llano Estacado Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference, Lubbock, TX, March 2004.

Bates College, Psychology Department Colloquium, Lewiston, Maine, April 2004.

Midwestern Psychological Association, Invited Address, Chicago, May 2004.

Illinois Judges Capital Cases Seminar, Chicago, invited talk, May 2004.

Wisconsin Attorney General's Law Enforcement Conference, La Crosse, WI, invited address, May 2004.

Intuition in Law Enforcment Conference, (sponsored by Department of Justice, FBI, and APA), invited speaker, June 2004.

Wrongful Convictions Seminar, invited address, Durham, North Carolina, June 2004.

Illinois Judges Capital Cases Seminar, Springfield, IL, invited talk, September 2004.

Cardoza Conference on Convicting the Guilty & Exonerating the Innocent, Manhattan, NY, invited talks, September, 2004.

National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, Atlanta, invited talks, October 2004.

National Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, Scottsdale, AZ, keynote address, October 2004.

Stanford University Law School, Palo Alto, CA, invited talk, October 2004.

Minnesota Prosecutors and Police, Minneapolis, invited presentation, October, 2004.

Yale University Law School, New Haven, CT, invited talk, November 2004.

Connecticut Innocence Commission, Hartford, CT, invited talk, November, 2004.

Tristate Undergraduate Psychology Confrerence, Plattville, WI, keynote address, November 2004.

Washington University Psychology Department Colloquium, November, 2004.

Metro Police Department and Federal Prosecutors, workshop/lecture, Washington, DC, December 2004.

Drake University Law School and American Judicature Society, invited talk, Des Moines, IA, January, 2005.

Hennepin County (Minnesota) Prosecutors and Minneapolis Police Department, invited lecture, Minneapolis, February 2005.

Louisiana State University Law School, invited lecture to Louisiana police, prosecutors, and judges, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, March 2005.

Wisconsin Department of Justice, lectures and workshops for Wisconsin law enforcement:
· April 28, 2005 in Appleton, Wisconsin;
· April 29, 2005 in Pewaukee, Wisconsin;
· May 5, 2005 in Madison, Wisconsin;
· May 6, 2005 in Sparta, Wisconsin;
· June 16, 2005 in Wausau, Wisconsin.

Massachusetts Bar Association, invited lectures, Boston, MA, May 2005.

Wisconsin Department of Justice, invited lecture to Wisconsin prosecutors, Green Lake, Wisconsin, June 15, 2005.

Baltimore Police Department and Maryland Police, invited presentations,  Baltimore, MD, November, 2005.

Wisconsin Law School, invited lecture, Madison, WI, November 2005.

San Antonio, National Conference on Forensic Science, Invited Address, January 2006

University of North Carolina -  Greensboro, Psychology Department colloquium, February 2006
 
 

                                              PUBLICATIONS

Charman, S. D., & Wells, G. L. (in press). Eyewitness lineups: Is the appearance-change instruction a good idea? Law and Human Behavior, in press.

Hasel, L., & Wells, G. L. (in press). Catching the bad guy: Morphing composite faces helps. Law and Human Behavior, in press.

Wells, G. L., Charman, S. D., & Olson, E. A. (2005). Building face composites can harm lineup identification performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 11, 147-157.

Brewer, N., & Wells, G. L. (in press). The confidence-accuracy relation in eyewitness identification: Effects of lineup instructions, foil similarity, and target-absent base rates. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, in press.

Charman, S. D. and Wells, G. L. (in press). Applied lineup theory. in D. Read et al. (Eds.) Handbook of Eyewitness Psychology. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Wells, G. L., & Charman, S. D. (in press). Eyewitness identification. In David S. Clark (Ed.) Encyclopedia of law and society. London: Sage Publications.

Bradfield, A. L. & Wells, G. L. (in press). Not the same old hindsight bias: Outcome information distorts a broad range of retrospective judgments. Memory and Cognition, in press.

Wells, G. L. (2005). Helping experimental psychology affect legal policy. In N. Brewer & K. Williams (Eds.) Psychology and law: An empirical perspective. New York: Guilford Publications, Inc.

Bradfield, A. L. & Wells, G. L. (in press). Not the same old hindsight bias: Outcome information distorts a broad range of retrospective judgments. Memory and Cognition, in press.

Weber, N., Brewer, N., Wells, G. L., Semmler, C, & Keast, A. (2004). Eyewitness identification accuracy and response latency: The unruly 10-12 second rule. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 10, 139-147.

Wells, G. L., & Charman, S. D. (in press). Eyewitness identification. In David S. Clark (Ed.) Encyclopedia of law and society. London: Sage Publications.

Wells, G. L. (2005). Eyewitness identification evidence: Science and reform. The Champion, April Issue (Cover Story) pages 12-21.

Semmler, C., Brewer, N., & Wells, G. L. (2004). Effects of postidentification feedback on eyewitness identification and nonidentification. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89, 334-346.

Olson, E. A., & Wells, G. L. (2004). What makes a good alibi? A proposed taxonomy. Law and Human Behavior, 28, 157-176.

Weber, N., Brewer, N., & Wells, G. L. (2004). Is there a “magical” decision latency that discriminates correct from incorrect eyewitness identifications? In A. Czerederecka, T. Jaskiewicz-Obydzinska, R. Roesch, and J. Wojciliewicz (Eds), Forensic psychology and law (pp.115-124). Krakow: Institute of Forensic Research Publishers.

Wells, G. L. (2003). Murder, extra-marital affairs, and the issue of probative value. Law and Human Behavior, 27, 623-628.

Wells, G. L., Olson, E., & Charman, S. (2003). Distorted retrospective eyewitness reports as functions of feedback and delay. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 9, 42-52.

Wells, G. L. & Olson, E. (2003). Eyewitness identification.  Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 277-295.

Turtle, J.W., Lindsay, R.C.L. & Wells, G.L. (2003). Best practice recommendations for eyewitness evidence procedures: New ideas for the oldest way to solve a case. The Canadian Journal of Police and Security Services, 1, 5-18.

Wells, G. L., Olson, E., & Charman, S. (2002).  Eyewitness identification confidence.  New Directions in Psychological Science, 11, 151-154..

Wells, G. L. & Olson, E. (2002). Eyewitness identification: Information gain from incriminating and exonerating behaviors. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 8, 155-167.

Wells, G. L. & Loftus, E. F. (2002).  Eyewitness memory for people and events.  In A. Goldstein, Ed.  Comprehensive handbook of psychology, Volume 11, Forensic psychology.  New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Wells, G. L.  (2002).  Eyewitness testimony.  Encyclopedia of psychology.  Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.

Bradfield, S. L., Wells, G.L, & Olson, E.A. (2002). The damaging effect of confirming feedback on the relation between eyewitness certainty and identification accuracy. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, 112-120.

Wells, G. L. (2002). Eyewitness testimony.  The encyclopedia of crime and punishment. Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire Publishing.

Wells, G. L. (2002). Eyewitness identification: Psychological aspects.  The encyclopedia of crime and justice. New York: Macmillan.

Wells, G. L. (2001).  Eyewitness lineups:  Data, theory, and policy.  Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7, 791-801.

Bushman, B. J., & Wells, G. L. (2001).  Narrative impressions of the literature:  The availability bias and the corrective properties of meta-analytic approaches.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27, 1123-1130.

Wells, G. L. & Olson, E. A. (2001). The other-race effect in eyewitness identification: What do we do about it? Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7, 230-246.

Wells, G. L., Malpass, R. S., Lindsay, R.C.L., Fisher, R.P., Turtle, J. W., & Fulero, S. (2000).  From the lab to the police station: A successful application of eyewitness research.  American Psychologist, 55, 581-598.

Bradfield, S. L. & Wells, G. L. (2000).  The perceived validity of eyewitness identification testimony:  A test of the five Biggers criteria.  Law and Human Behavior, 24, 581-594.

Wells, G. L. (2000).  Eyewitness testimony.  Reader’s Guide to the Social Sciences,  London: Fitzroy/Dearborn, 645-646.

Wells, G. L. & Bradfield, A. L. (1999). Distortions in eyewitnesses' recollections: Can the postidentification feedback effect be moderated? Psychological Science, 10, 138-144.

Wells, G. L., & Windschitl, P. D. (1999).  Stimulus sampling in social psychological experimentation.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 25, 1115-1125.

Wells, G. L. (1999).  Improving eyewitness identification evidence.  Psychological Science Agenda, 12, 8-10.

Wells, G. L., & Bradfield, A. L. (1999). Measuring the goodness of lineups: Parameter estimation, question effects, and limits to the mock witness paradigm. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 13, 27-40.

Wells, G. L., Wright, E. F., & Bradfield, A. L. (1999). Witnesses to crime: Social and  cognitive factors governing the validity of people’s reports. In R. Roesch & S. Hart (Eds.) Psychology and law: State of the discipline (pp. 53-87). New York: Plenum Press.

Bushman, B. J. & Wells, G. L. (1998).  Trait aggressiveness and hockey penalties: Predicting hot tempers on the ice. Journal of Applied Psychology, 83, 969-974.

Wells, G. L. & Bradfield, A. L. (1998). “Good, you identified the suspect:” Feedback to eyewitnesses distorts their reports of the witnessing experience. Journal of Applied Psychology, 83, 360-376.

Windschitl, P. D., & Wells, G. L. (1998).  The alternative outcomes effect.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75, 1411-1423.

Wells, G. L., Small, M., Penrod, S. J., Malpass, R. S., Fulero, S. M., & Brimacombe, C. A. E. (1998). Eyewitness identification procedures: Recommendations for lineups and photospreads. Law and Human Behavior, 22, 603-647.

Wells, G. L. (1998). Eyewitness testimony. Encyclopedia of psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, in press.

Windschitl, P. D. & Wells, G. L. (1997). Behavioral consensus information affects people’s inferences about population traits. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23, 148-153.

Wells, G. L. (1997). Do the eyes have it? Contemporary Psychology, 413-414.

Turtle, J. W. & Wells, G. L. (1997). Partners in crime: Giving away psychology to police.  Contemporary Psychology, 42, 219-220.
Wells, G. L. (1997). Eyewitness identification.  In D. Faigman, D. Kaye, M. Saks, & J. Sanders (Eds.) , Modern scientific evidence: The law and science of expert testimony (pp. 451-479). St. Paul: West Publishing Co.

Windschitl, P. D. & Wells, G. L. (1996). Measuring psychological uncertainty: Verbal vs numeric methods. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 2, 343-364

Nettles, W., Nettles, Z. & Wells, G.L. (1996). “I noticed you paused on number three:” Biased testing in eyewitness identification. Champion, November.

Windschitl, P. D. & Wells, G. L. (1996). Base rates do not constrain non-probability judgments. Behavoral and Brain Sciences, 19, 40-41.

Luus, C. A. E., Wells, G. L., & Turtle, J. W.  (1995).  Child eyewitnesses:  Seeing is believing.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 80, 317-326.

Wells, G. L. & Leippe, M. R. (1995). Prospects and problems with partial identification. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 22, 373-385.

Wells, G. L. & Seelau, E. P. (1995). Eyewitness identification: Psychological research and legal policy on lineups. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law , 1, 765-791

Kasimatis, M. & Wells, G.L. (1995). Individual differences in counterfactual thinking. In N.J Roese & J.M. Olson (Eds.)  What might have been: The social psychology of counterfactual thinking (pp. 103-132). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc.

Seelau, E. P., Seelau, S. M., Wells, G. L. (1995). Counterfactual constraints. In N.J Roese & J.M. Olson (Eds.) What might have been: The social psychology of counterfactual thinking (pp. 81-102). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc.

Wells, G. L. (1995) Scientific study of witness memory: Implications for public and legal policy. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law , 1, 726-731.

Seelau, S. M. & Wells, G. L. (1995). Applied eyewitness research: The other mission. Law and Human Behavior, 19, 317-322.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L.  (1994).  Determinants of eyewitness confidence.  In D. F. Ross, J. D. Read, & M. P. Toglia (Eds.), Adult eyewitness testimony:  Current trends and developments, pp. 348-362.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Wells, G. L., Seelau, E., Rydell, S., & Luus, C. A. E.  (1994).  Recommendations for conducting lineups.  In D. F. Ross, J. D. Read, & M. P. Toglia (Eds.), Adult eyewitness testimony:  Current trends and developments, pp. 223-244.  New York:  Cambridge  University Press.

Wells, G. L.  (1994).  The perceived credibility of eyewitness.  In M. D. MacLeod & M. Macrae (Eds.), Stereotypes in the criminal justice system.  London:  The Falmer Press.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L.  (1994).  The malleability of eyewitness confidence:  Co-witness and perseverance effects.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 79, 714-723.

Wells, G. L., Luus, C. A. E., & Windschitl, P. D.  (1994).  Maximizing the utility of eyewitness identification evidence.  Current Directions in Psychological Science 3, 194-197. [Reprinted in Annual Editions: Social Psychology (1996). Guilford, CT: Dushkin Pub.]

Wells, G. L. (1993). What do we know about eyewitness identification? American Psychologist, 48, 553-571.

Wells, G. L., & Windschitl, P. D.  (1993).  What's in a question?  Contemporary Psychology, 38, 383-385.

Wells, G. L., Rydell, S. M., & Seelau, E. P.  (1993).  On the selection of distractors for  eyewitness lineups.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 78, 835-844.

Wells, G. L.  (1993).  Perceived legitimacy and legal compliance.  Contemporary Psychology, 38, 294.

Wright, E. F., Rule, B. G., Ferguson, T. J., & McGuire, G. R., & Wells, G. L.  (1992).
 Misattribution of dissonance and behavior-consistent attitude change.  Canadian Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 24, 456-464.

Wells, G. L.  (1992).  Naked statistical evidence of liability:  Is subjective probability enough? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 62, 739-752.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L.  (1992).  The perceived credibility of child eyewitnesses.  In H. Dent & R. Flin (Eds.), Children as witnesses (pp. 73-92).  New York:  John Wiley & Sons.

Wells, G. L.  (1992).  The acoustics of crime.  Contemporary Psychology, 37, 263.

Johnson, R., Rennie, R., & Wells, G. L.  (1991).  Outcome trees and baseball:  A study of omission effects.  Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50, 324-340.

Luus, C. A. E., & Wells, G. L.  (1991).  Eyewitness identification and the selection of distracters for lineups.  Law and Human Behavior, 15, 43-57.

Yuille, J. C., & Wells, G. L.  (1991).  Concerns about the application of research findings:  The issue of ecological validity.  In J. L. Doris (Ed.), The suggestibilitv of children's recollections (pp. 118-128).  Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.

Wells, G. L., & Loftus, E. F.  (1991).  Is this child fabricating?  Reactions to a new assessment technique.  In J. L. Doris (Ed.), The suggestibility of children's recollections (pp. 168-171). Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.

Wells, G. L.  (1990).  Identifying Ivan:  A case study in legal psychology.  Social Behavior, 13, 110-121.

Wells, G. L., & Luus, C. A. E.  (1990).  The diagnosticity of a lineup should not be confused with the diagnostic value of non-lineup evidence.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 75, 511-516.

Wells, G. L., & Luus, E.  (1990).  Police lineups as experiments:  Social methodology as a framework for properly-conducted lineups.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 16, 106--117.

Wells, G. L.  (1990).  Who is Ivan?  A lesson in system variable eyewitness violations. Contemporary Psychology, 35, 876-877.

Lindsay, R. C. L., Wells, G. L., & O'Connor, F.  (1989).  Mock juror belief of accurate and inaccurate eyewitnesses: A replication.  Law and Human Behavior, 13, 333-340.

Gavanski, I., & Wells, G. L.  (1989).  Counterfactual processing of normal and exceptional events.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 25, 314-325.

Wells, G. L., Turtle, J. W., & Luus, C. A.  (1989).  The perceived credibility of child eyewitnesses: What happens when they use their own words?  In Ceci et al. (Eds.), Children take the stand: Adult perceptions of children's testimony (pp. 23-39).  New York:  Springer-Verlag.

Wells, G. L., & Gavanski, I.  (1989).  Mental simulation of causality.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 56, 161-169.

Wright, E. F., & Wells, G. L.  (1988).  Is the attitude-attribution paradigm suitable for testing the dispositional bias?  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 14, 183-190.

WeIIs, G. L.  (1988).  Eyewitness identification:  A system handbook.  Toronto:  Carswell Legal Publications.

WeIIs, G. L., & Turtle, J. W.  (1988).  What is the best way to encode faces?  In M. W. Gruneberg et al. (Eds.), Practical aspects of memory (pp. 163-168).  New York:  Wiley.

Turtle, J. W., & Wells, G. L.  (1988).  Children versus adults as eyewitnesses:  Whose testimony holds up under cross examination?  In M. W. Gruneberg et al. (Eds.), Practical aspects of memory (pp. 27-33).  New York:  Wiley.

Wells, G. L., & Turtle, J. W.  (1987).  Eyewitness testimony:  Current knowledge and emergent controversies.  Canadian Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 19, 363-388.

Wells, G. L., & Loftus, E. F.  (1987).  Eyewitness testimony.  International encyclopedia of communications.  Philadelphia, PA:  Annenberg School of Communications and Oxford Univ. Press.

Wells, G. L.  (1987).  Behavioral scientists in courts and corrections.  Canadian Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 19, 391-392.

Turtle, J. W., & Wells, G. L.  (1987).  Setting the stage for psychological research on the child eyewitness.  In S. J. Ceci, M. P. Toglia, & D. F. Ross (Eds.), Children's eyewitness memory, New York:  Springer-Verlag Publishers.

Wells, G. L., Taylor, B. R., & Turtle, J. W.   (1987).  The undoing of scenarios.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 53, 421-430.

Wells, G. L., & Turtle, J. W.  (1986).  Eyewitness identification:  The importance of lineup models.  Psychological Bulletin, 99, 320-329.

Wells, G. L.  (1986).  Expert psychological testimony:  Empirical and conceptual analyses of effects.  Law and Human Behavior, 10, 83-96.

Wells, G. L., & Wright, E. F.  (1986).  Practical issues in eyewitness research.  In J. Kaplan (Ed.), The impact of social psychology on procedural justice.  Springfield, IL:  Chas. C. Thomas.

Wells, G. L.  (1985).  Verbal descriptions of faces from memory:  Are they diagnostic of identification accuracy?  Journal of Applied Psychology, 70, 619-626.
 

Wells, G. L., Wrightsman, L. S., & Meine, P.  (1985).  The timing of the defense opening statement:  Don't wait until the evidence is in.  Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 15, 758-772.

Wells, G. L.  (1985).  The conjunction error and the representativeness heuristic.  Social Cognition, 3, 266-279.

Wright, E. F., & Wells, G. L.  (1985).  Does group discussion attenuate the dispositional bias? Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 15, 531-546.

Lindsay, R. C. L., & Wells, G. L.  (1985).  Improving eyewitness identification from lineups:  Simultaneous versus sequential lineup presentations.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 70, 556--564.

Wells, G. L., & Lindsay, R. C. L.  (1985).  Methodological notes on the accuracy-confidence relationship in eyewitness identifications.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 70, 413-419.

Wells, G. L.  (1985).  Experimental psychology and the courtroom.  Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 4, 363-374.

Wells, G. L.  (1985).  The eyewitness.  In S. Kassin & L. Wrightsman (Eds.), The psychology of evidence and courtroom procedure.  Beverly Hills, CA:  Sage.

Wells, G. L.  (1985).  Thinking about people.  Contemporary Psychology, 30, 376-377.

Wells, G. L.  (1985).  Another attribution book:  Trivial pursuit or nascent directions?
 Contemporary Psychology, 30, 65-67.

Wells, G. L., & Hryciw, B.  (1984).  Memory for faces:  Encoding and retrieval operations.  Memory and Cognition, 12, 338-344.

Wells, G. L., Enzle, M. E., & Hoffman, C.  (1984).  Self versus other-referent processing at encoding and retrieval.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 10, 574-584.

Wells, G. L.  (1984).  The psychology of lineup identifications.  Journal of Applied Social
 Psychology, 14, 89-103.

Wells, G. L.  (1984).  Do the eyes have it?  More on expert eyewitness testimony.  American Psychologist, (comment), 39, 1064-1065.

Wells, G. L.  (1984).  A re-evaluation of the expert testimony issue.  In G. L. Wells & E. F. Loftus (Eds.), Eyewitness testimony:  Psychological perspectives.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Wells, G. L.  (1984).  How adequate is human intuition for judging eyewitness testimony?  In G. L. Wells & E. F. Loftus (Eds.), Eyewitness testimony:  Psychological perspectives.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Wells, G. L., & Murray, D.  (1984).  Eyewitness confidence.  In G. L. Wells & E. F. Loftus Eds.), Eyewitness testimony:  Psychological perspectives.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Wells, G. L., & Loftus, E. F.  (1984).  Eyewitness research:  Then and now.  In G. L. Wells & E. F. Loftus (Eds.), Eyewitness testimony:  Psychological perspectives.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Wells, G. L., & Loftus, E. F. (Eds.).  (1984).  Eyewitness testimony:  Psychological perspectives. New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Wells, G. L., & Murray, D. M.  (1983).  What can psychology say about the Neil vs. Biggers criteria for judging eyewitness identification accuracy?  Journal of Applied Psychology, 68, 347-362.

Petty, R. E., Wells, G. L., Heesacker, M., Cacioppo, J. T., & Brock, T. C.  (1983).  The effects of recipient posture on persuasion:  A cognitive response analysis.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 9, 209-222.

Wells, G. L., & Lindsay, R. C. L.  (1983).  How do people infer the accuracy of memory?  Studies of performance and a metamemory analysis.  In S. Lloyd-Bostock & B. R. Clifford (Eds.), Witness evidence:  Critical and empirical papers.  New York:  Wiley.

Lindsay, R. C. L., & Wells, G. L.  (1983).  What do we really know about cross-race identifications?  In S. Lloyd-Bostock & B. R. Clifford (Eds.), Witness evidence:  Critical and empirical papers.  New York:  Wiley.

Wells, G. L.  (1982).  The psychology of eyewitness testimony.  The High School Psychology Teacher, 13, 2-3.

Wells, G. L., & Ronis, D.  (1982).  Discounting and augmentation:  Is there anything special about the number of causes?  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 8, 566-572.

Wells, G. L.  (1982).  Attribution and reconstructive memory.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 18, 447-463.

Murray, D., & Wells, G. L.  (1982).  Does knowledge that a crime was staged affect eyewitness performance?  Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 12, 42-53.

Wells, G. L.  (1982).  Gaps and canyons in psycho-legal research.  [Review of Eyewitness testimony and jury behavior].  Contemporary Psychology, 27, 55-56.

Wells, G. L., & Leippe, M. R.  (1981).  How do triers of fact infer the accuracy of eyewitness identifications?  Memory for peripheral detail can be misleading.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 66, 682-687.

Wells, G. L., Ferguson, T. J., & Lindsay, R. C. L.  (1981).  The tractability of eyewitness confidence and its implication for triers of fact.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 66, 688-696.

Lindsay, R. C. L., Wells, G. L., & Rumpel, C.  (1981).  Can people detect eyewitness identification accuracy within and between situations?  Journal of Applied Psychology, 66, 79-89.

Rule, B. G., & Wells, G. L.  (1981).  Experimental social psychology in Canada:  A look at the seventies.  Canadian Psychology, 22, 69-84.

Wells, G. L.  (1981).  Lay analyses of causal forces on behavior.  In J. Harvey (Ed.), Cognition, behavior, and the environment.  Hillsdale, NJ:  Erlbaum Assoc.

Wells, G. L., Lindsay, R. C. L., & Tousignant, J. P.  (1980).  Effects of expert psychological advice on juror judgments in eyewitness testimony.  Law and Human Behavior, 4, 275-286.

Wells, G. L. (1980). Eyewitness behavior:  The Alberta Conference.  Law and Human Behavior, 4, 237-242.

Lindsay, R. C. L., & Wells, G. L.  (1980).  What price justice?  Exploring the relationship between lineup fairness and identification accuracy.  Law and Human Behavior, 4, 303-314.

Wells, G. L., Lindsay, R. C. L., & Tousignant, J. P.  (1980).  Effects of expert psychological advice on human performance in judging the validity of eyewitness testimony.  Law and Human Behavior, 4, 275-286.  Reprinted in Controversies in the courtroom by Wrightsman, Kassin & Willis, Sage Pub., 1987.

Wells, G. L., & Petty, R. E.  (1980).  The effects of head movement on persuasion:  Compatibility and incompatibility of responses.  Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 1, 219-230.

Wells, G. L.  (1980).  Asymmetric attributions for compliance:  Reward vs. punishment.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 16, 47-60.

Wells, G. L., & Lindsay, R. C. L.  (1980).  On estimating the diagnosticity of eyewitness nonidentifications.  Psychological Bulletin, 88, 776-784.

Ferguson, T. J., & Wells, G. L.  (1980).  The priming of mediators in causal attribution.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 461-470.

Wells, G. L.  (1980).  [Review of The psychology of evewitness testimony].  Canadian Psychology, 21, 40-41.

Wells, G. L., Leippe, M. R., & Ostrom, T. M.  (1979).  Guidelines for empirically assessing the fairness of a lineup.  Law and Human Behavior, 3, 285-293.

Wells, G. L., Lindsay, R. C. L., & Ferguson, T. J.  (1979).  Accuracy, confidence, and juror perceptions in eyewitness identification.  Journal of Applied Psychology 64, 440-448.

Wells, G. L.  (1978).  Applied eyewitness testimony research:  System variables and estimator variables.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36, 1546-1557.

Leippe, M. R., Wells, G. L., & Ostrom, T. M.  (1978).  Crime seriousness as a determinant of accuracy in eyewitness identification.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 63, 345-351.

Wells, G. L., & Harvey, J. H.  (1978).  Naive attributors' attributions and predictions:  What is informative and when is an effect an effect?  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36, 483-490.

Harvey, J. H., Wells, G. L., & Alvarez, M. D.  (1978).  Attribution in the context of conflict and separation in close relationships.  In J. H. Harvey, W. Ickes, & R. Kidd (Eds.), New directions in attribution research (Vol. 2).  Hillsdale, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc.

Wells, G. L., Petty, R. E., Harkins, S. G., Kagehiro, D., & Harvey, J. H.  (1977). Anticipated discussion of interpretation eliminates actor-observer differences in the attribution of causality. Sociometry, 40, 247-253.

Wells, G. L., & Harvey, J. H.  (1977).  Do people use consensus information in making causal attributions?  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 35, 279-293.

Wells, G. L.  (1976).  Attitude change validity:  Reply to Hendrick and Bukoff.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 34, 1076-1077.

Wells, G. L.  (1976).  Reassessing the validity of laboratory-produced attitude change.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 34, 1062-1067.

Petty, R. E., Wells, G. L., & Brock, T. C.  (1976).  Distraction can enhance or reduce yielding to  propaganda:  Thought disruption versus effort justification.  Journal of Personality and  Social Psychology, 34, 874-884.