Alison L. Morris, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Department of Psychology

Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-3180

Office: Room 490 Science Hall
Phone: 515 294-7532

Email: almorris@iastate.edu

 

To get to my Psychology of Language course, Click Here

 

Research Interests: My principal area of research is visual word recognition - specifically, the nature of the representations and the types of mechanisms involved in skilled reading. More generally, my research focuses on interactions among attention, perception, language, and memory. Ongoing projects in my lab include computational modeling of orthographic priming, short-term repetition priming and repetition blindness effects; semantic interference in picture and word naming; and attentional orienting effects in familiarity-based recognition.
Selected Recent Publications: Morris, A. L., & Still, M. L. (in press). Orthographic similarity: The case of "reversed anagrams". Memory & Cognition.

Morris, A. L., Still, M. L., & Caldwell-Harris, C. L. (2009). Repetition blindness: An emergent property of inter-item competition. Cognitive Psychology, 58, 338-375.

Morris, A. L., Cleary, A. M., & Still, M. L. (2008). The role of autonomic arousal in feelings of familiarity. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1378-1385.

Morris, A. L., & Still, M. L. (2008). Now you see it, now you don't: Repetition blindness for nonwords. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 146-166.

Caldwell-Harris, C.l., & Morris, A. L. (2008). Fast pairs: A visual word recognition paradigm for measuring entrenchment, top-down effects, and subjective phenomenology. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1063-1081.

Morris, A. L., Still, M. L., Caldwell-Harris, C. L., & Atkinson, M. D. (2007). Semantic interference and associative facilitation from words presented in rapid serial visual presentation. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 755-761.

Cleary, A. M., Morris, A. L., & Langley, M. M. (2007). Recognition memory for novel stimuli: The structural regularity hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 379-393.